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Visionaries see things that others can’t yet. They draw a straight line of sight between now and might be. What gives them that capacity? Surely it’s a combination of knowledge, powerful intellect, focus and enduring passion. Consider this, if eyes are the window to the soul, then what we believe, our purpose and meaning, our strengths and skills, experiences and choices project an image onto the wall of life we see around us. It’s a figment we reach towards and bring to life, day by day. Some would call it self fulfilling. Every lens is unique.

We know that MLK dreamed, Lennon imagined, Jobs believed. They each saw a particular future for themselves and others.

If you are working on something exciting that you really care about, you don’t have to be pushed. Your vision pulls you. – Steve Jobs

What vision is pulling you and what purpose and strengths will carry you forward? Let’s return for a moment to choices. It’s great if you’re pumping with passion. But how do you engage in work when what you do every day isn’t exactly ‘you’ or what you love? If it’s a means to an end, serving other higher value life priorities for now, you’re not alone. That’s fine provided you’re mindful of the difference between what you love, who you are and what you choose to do, especially when they’re at odds with where you are right now. How do you derive more satisfaction from every day when you’re not alight with enthusiasm and excitement? Curiously, the answer sits in the same set of qualities visionaries claim to enjoy.

Here’s five steps to creating your vision or simply building greater satisfaction

  1. Find the purpose in what you’re doing and focus on it. What bigger picture is at play and how are you contributing?
  2. Reflect on the strengths you bring to the task at hand. How can you apply your strengths for better outcomes with less effort? Using your strengths seldom requires onerous labour, they’re natural resources you can cultivate to very good effect.
  3. Consider what skills you’re using and growing right now. Apply them to the best of your ability. I heard Mark Carnegie recently say he applies the ISO9000 Standards test to everything he does. Know what skills can you enhance and refine and those you want to develop further. Work on your enduring, transferrable ‘soft’ skills.
  4. Seek out opportunities. If you dig a little deeper, you’re likely to find creative ways to build your experience and value right at your fingertips. Think of practical ways to own your choices – build deeper networks inside and outside your role and organisation, find others who share your bigger purpose, put your hand up for new and more complex projects, share your knowledge, mentor others, get involved.
  5. Be curious and remain open. Accepting the possibility of greater satisfaction in your current circumstances could reveal brand new possibilities. If you can’t change your role right now, at least change your attitude. Own your choices.

If you’re doing all these things, your vision and purpose will eventually come to you. If you’re still really unhappy, ask why and then wait for the answer. Resist the fleeting rhetorical question, which may mean placing fear on hold a moment. Once you’ve listened, build a concrete plan to move forward. What you’re doing today is, to a greater or lesser extent, creating value for you – it’s an asset in the making. You’re asset. You get to choose how you’ll invest and what your return will be. Remember, your best path to opportunity and a great future is doing well today.

Bring your vision to life today. Sign up at PlanDo or contact us at support@plando.com to find out more or request a demo.

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